Collectors Weekly

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weirdvintage:

Colored toilet paper was introduced in the 1950s, and remained popular until the 1970s.  Homeowners loved coordinating everything in their bathroom, and could buy colors like pink, blue, lavender, yellow, beige, green, and even black.  
Sales began to decline as doctors pointed out that the dyes could cause skin sensitivities, and ecologists said that the dye could be harmful to the environment.  Scott still produced beige, tan and pink until 2004.  But never fear!  Renova is a company that creates highly pigmented toilet paper, including black and fuchsia.  It assures that it is “colorfast for its intended use,” and is “dermatologically and gynecologically tested.”  
(Photo via Vintage Ad Browser.  The history of colored toilet paper from ToiletPaperWorld.com)

weirdvintage:

Colored toilet paper was introduced in the 1950s, and remained popular until the 1970s.  Homeowners loved coordinating everything in their bathroom, and could buy colors like pink, blue, lavender, yellow, beige, green, and even black.  

Sales began to decline as doctors pointed out that the dyes could cause skin sensitivities, and ecologists said that the dye could be harmful to the environment.  Scott still produced beige, tan and pink until 2004.  But never fear!  Renova is a company that creates highly pigmented toilet paper, including black and fuchsia.  It assures that it is “colorfast for its intended use,” and is “dermatologically and gynecologically tested.”  

(Photo via Vintage Ad Browser.  The history of colored toilet paper from ToiletPaperWorld.com)

(via weirdvintage)

During his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria, Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of: He focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors.

Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here.

(Source: smithsonian)

Centripetal Spring Chair made by the American Chair Company, circa mid-19th century. This prototype of the modern office chair was eventually deemed immoral, because it was essentially too comfortable.

Centripetal Spring Chair made by the American Chair Company, circa mid-19th century. This prototype of the modern office chair was eventually deemed immoral, because it was essentially too comfortable.

(Source: randommanipulation, via emptyring)